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SOFT News

SOFT News

Newgrange Winter Solstice 2023

Newgrange Winter Solstice 2023

 

Newgrangs Winter Solstice

Newgrange Winter Solstice 2023

Newgrangs Winter Solstice

 

The Winter Solstice is an astronomical phenomenon that marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, the Winter Solstice occurs on 21 or 22 December, when the sun shines directly over the tropic of Capricorn. At sunrise on the shortest day of the year, for 17 minutes, direct sunlight can enter the Newgrange monument, not through the doorway, but through the specially contrived small opening above the entrance known as the ‘roof box’, to illuminate the Chamber.

Newgrange is best known for the illumination of its passage and chamber by the rising sun at the Winter Solstice. Above the entrance to the passage of the mound there is a opening called a roof-box. On mornings around the winter solstice a beam of light penetrates the roof-box and travels up the 19m (62ft) passage and into the chamber. As the sun rises higher, the beam widens so that the whole chamber is dramatically illuminated.

A live stream has also been set up to allow interested observers to catch a glimpse of direct sunlight entering the chamber of the 5,000-year-old passage tomb.

The solar alignment of the passage tomb at Newgrange to face the rising sun on winter solstice is a significant astronomical finding of global importance.

Originally re-discovered by Professor Michael J O’Kelly in 1967, other researchers have since then validated O’Kelly’s interpretation, giving it scientific credibility and meaning.

Analysis of high-resolution imagery taken during last year’s research programme adds to the convincing body of evidence that the solar illumination of the tomb was intentional.

People across the world are invited to tune into this phenomenal event, which can be viewed live on

gov.ie/opw

and

heritageireland.ie

 

I Donated

 

Reykjanes peninsula

Reykjanes peninsula

A volcano erupted on Monday night in southwest Iceland following weeks of intense earthquake activity, the country’s Meteorological Office said.

Fearing a significant outbreak on the Reykjanes peninsula, authorities in recent days evacuated the nearly 4,000 inhabitants of the fishing town of Grindavik and closed the nearby Blue Lagoon geothermal spa.

“Warning: Eruption has started north of Grindavik by Hagafell,” the Met Office said on its website.

Reykjanes is a volcanic and seismic hot-spot southwest of the capital Reykjavik.